Types of Graphs

By   September 29, 2019

In just two years, they have saved 14 million packs of food (surprise packages, as the store sells the surplus of the day), thanks to ten million users in eleven European countries – the last to join, Italy and Poland. And in Spain, where it landed in September 2018, there are already 300,000 users, 1,000 establishments and 100,000 lots of food that have been freed from garbage. It is a “social business” -as the Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Types of Graphs called them-, a company without losses or dividends, whose objective is to invest in solving a social problem. “Our formula is win-win-win, that is, the user wins, the store wins and the planet wins,” explains Reull. Of course, there is a business model behind: the application charges a commission (close to one euro) for each package of food sold. The company raised 6 million euros in a round of financing last February. With this injection of capital – it has achieved 16 million euros in its two years of life – it has managed to consolidate itself in the markets in which it was present and open up to new ones. He took his first steps in Madrid and Barcelona, ​​cities in which the app has taken hold; now it saves meals in more than 25 cities of fifteen Spanish provinces.

 

Types of Graphs

The establishments that are in Too Good To Go usually also work with “delivery” companies. “We do not want to compete with those applications, in the first place, because we should be complementary,” says Reull. In addition, your audience is different because, since you have to go pick up food, live near the establishment, which benefits the community. And, of course, “there is the awareness factor,” he adds.

Different Types of Graphs

Different Types of Graphs

Types of Graph Curves

Types of Graph Curves

Types of Graphs In Data Structure

Types of Graphs In Data Structure

Types of Graphs In Math

Types of Graphs

 

To reach all corners of Spain, that is ambition. Although now the company focuses on the waste that occurs in establishments (restaurants, hotels, supermarkets, bakeries, etc.), that is, food that is already prepared, look beyond. “We want to impact the entire chain: from farmers, producers, distributors, to homes,” says Reull. Because it is not only about saving food: the waste of food is one of the main emitters of CO2 worldwide. With several “partners” in the Old Continent -including Starbucks and Types of Graphs-, they hope to continue incorporating great brands into their project, which has saved 29,000 tons of CO2 in Europe and 140 in Spain. The iconic Canadian chain of coffee shops Tim Hortons has been the last to participate in this European movement. Reull does not hesitate: “In the coming months, we will see how big brands say” no “to the waste of food and join Too Good To Go».

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *